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Array
(
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(
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(

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    Ivy League  echo $newRAM;
    added Thu September 23 2004 at 1:25 PM
    0 comments
    I have a confession to make. I own a Princeton sweatshirt. It sits on my bed with a pllow stuffed inside it. I don't wear it anymore because it's smaller than what I find to be comfortable for a sweatshirt. However, my posession of a Princeton sweatshirt does not imply that I ever wanted to go there. It just has a really cool tiger picture on it. Maybe the author of Ivy League Reject should consider that people often have other reasons to wear clothing from a university than because they wish they could attend there.

    I'll admit that I never received an acceptance letter from any ivy league schools. I did, however, receive a huge number of letters from them asking me to apply and promising ample financial aid. These letters were all thrown into the recycle bin. It is rather ignorant to assume that someone at BYU could not have gotten into an ivy league or comparable school.

    I would suggest that most people wear ivy league branded clothing not because they wish they could go there, but because it's "cool," a friend or relative attend or work there, they used to attend there, or even because they plan to attend graduate school at that institution. Bottom line is that you shouldn't assume that because somebody *didn't* go to a specific university does not mean that they *couldn't* go to that university.

    "I favor electing liberal Democrats over the next ten years"  echo $newRAM;
    added Thu September 23 2004 at 2:29 PM
    2 comments
    I got a package from mom today (thanks mom), and she included a leter from the Republican National Committee asking me to complete their "Census Document." I took a look over it because it felt more productive than playing Freecell. Keep in mind, though, that I am not a Republican. I do not align myself with any political party for reasons beyond the scope of this entry.

    I do not think I have ever filled out a more biased survey in my life. Every single question was phrased in such a way that if you answered other than the expected answer, you look like a terrorist or a heartless, ignorant fool. I did, however answer a few questions contrary to their desired answers. For example, in light of recent emails from Jacob, and my own dealings with "qualified" teachers, I answered no to "Should students, teachers, principals and administrators be held to higher standards?" This is code for getting rid of "unqualified" teachers that actually care more about students' learning than test scores.

    The final question took the cake and made me decide to actually fill out the survey and mail it back. It reads:
    Will you join the Republican National Committee by making a contribution today?
    • Yes, I support the RNC and am enclosing my most generous contribution of: [...]
    • Yes, I support the RNC, but I am unable to participate at this time. However, I have enclosed $11 to cover the cost of tabulating my survey.
    • No, I favor electing liberal Democrats over the next ten years

    Would anybody like to make a guess as to which option I selected?

    On the included envelope, it has a note saying "By using your own first class stamp to return this envelope, you will be helping us save much needed funds.--Thank you." I looked over and saw the normal Business Reply Mail stamp "No postage necessary if mailed in the united states." and I will most certainly charge the RNC the 37 cents for wasting my time with poorly disguised fund raising efforts.